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Design and Construction of Modern Steel Railway Bridges

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Descripción

This new edition encompasses current design methods used for steel railway bridges in both SI and Imperial (US Customary) units. It discusses the planning of railway bridges and the appropriate types of bridges based on planning considerations.


Características

  • ISBN: 9781498734103
  • Páginas: 686
  • Tamaño: 17x24
  • Edición:
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • Año: 2017

Disponibilidad: 3 a 7 Días

Contenido Design and Construction of Modern Steel Railway Bridges


Updated throughout to reflect changes in the field since the first edition.

Examines the engineering properties of structural steel typically used in modern steel railway bridge design and fabrication.

Presents criteria for the maximum effects from moving loads and their use in developing design live railway loads- which is not available in typical bridge engineering books.

Explains the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-way Association design specifications.

Discusses the history of iron and steel railway bridges with numerous examples.

Summary

This new edition encompasses current design methods used for steel railway bridges in both SI and Imperial (US Customary) units. It discusses the planning of railway bridges and the appropriate types of bridges based on planning considerations.

Table Contents

Contents
Acknowledgment
Preface to the Second Edition..
Author

Chapter 1 History and Development of Steel Railway Bridges.

1.1 Introduction
1.2 Iron Railway Bridges.
   1.2.1 Cast Iron Construction
   1.2.2 Wrought Iron Construction
1.3 Steel Railway Bridges
1.4 The Development of Railway Bridge Engineering
   1.4.1 Strength of Materials and Structural Mechanics
   1.4.2 Railway Bridge Design Specifications
   1.4.3 Modern Steel Railway Bridge Design
Bibliography

Chapter 2 Steel for Modern Railway Bridges

2.1 Introduction
2.2 Manufacture of Structural Steel.
2.3 Engineering Properties of Steel..
2.3.1 Strength
2.3.1.1 Elastic Yield Strength of Steel.
2.3.1.2 Fatigue Strength of Steel
2.3.2 Ductility.
2.3.3 Fracture Resistance
2.3.4 Weldability
2.3.5 Corrosion Resistance
2.4 Types of Structural Steel
2.4.1 Carbon Steels
2.4.2 High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels
2.4.3 Heat-Treated Low-Alloy Steels
2.4.4 High-Performance Steels
2.5 Structural Steel for Railway Superstructures
2.5.1 Material Properties
2.5.2 Structural S
References

Chapter 3 Planning and Preliminary Design of Modern Steel Railway Bridges

3.1 Introduction
3.2 Planning of Railway Bridges
   3.2.1 Bridge Crossing Economics.
   3.2.2 Railroad Operating Requirements.
   3.2.3 Site Conditions (Public and Technical Requirements of Bridge Crossings)
      3.2.3.1 Regulatory Requirements.
      3.2.3.2 Hydrology and Hydraulics of the Bridge Crossing
      3.2.3.3 Highway, Railway, and Marine Clearances
      3.2.3.4 Geotechnical Conditions
   3.2.4 Geometry of the Track and Bridge
      3.2.4.2 Vertical Geometry of the Bridge
3.3 Preliminary Design of Steel Railway Bridges
   3.3.1 Bridge A Esthetics
   3.3.2 Steel Railway Bridge Superstructures
      3.3.2.1 Bridge Decks for Steel Railway Bridges.
      3.3.2.2 Bridge Framing Details
   3.3.3 Bridge Stability
   3.3.4 Pedestrian Walkways
   3.3.5 General Design Criteria
      3.3.5.1 Structural Analysis for Modern Steel Superstructure Design
      3.3.5.2 Structural Design for Modern Steel Superstructure Fabrication
   3.3.6 Fabrication Considerations
   3.3.7 Erection Considerations.
   3.3.8 Detailed Design of the Superstructure
References..

Chapter 4 Loads and Forces on Steel Railway Bridges.

4.1 Introduction.
4.2 Dead Loads.
4.3 Railway Live Loads
   4.3.1 Static Freight Train Live Load.
      4.3.1.1 Cooper’s Design Live Load for Projected Railway Equipment
      4.3.1.2 Fatigue Design Live Load for Railway Equipment...
   4.3.2 Dynamic Freight Train Live Load
      4.3.2.1 Rocking and Vertical Dynamic Forces
      4.3.2.2 Design Impact Load.
      4.3.2.3 Longitudinal Forces due to Traction and Braking
      4.3.2.4 Centrifugal Forces
      4.3.2.5 Lateral Forces from Moving Freight Equipment
   4.3.3 Distribution of Live Load
      4.3.3.1 Distribution of Live Load for Open Deck Steel Bridges
      4.3.3.2 Distribution of Live Load for Ballasted Deck Steel Bridges
      4.3.3.3 Distribution of Live Load for Direct Fixation Deck Steel Bridges
4.4 Environmental and Other Steel Railway Bridge Design Forces
   4.4.1 Wind Forces on Steel Railway Bridges
   4.4.2 Thermal Forces from Continuous Welded Rail on Steel Railway Bridges
      4.4.2.1 Safe Rail Separation Criteria.
      4.4.2.2 Safe Stress in the CWR to Preclude Buckling
      4.4.2.3 Acceptable Relative Displacement between Rail-to-Deck and Deck-to-Span
      4.4.2.4 Design for CWR on Steel Railway Bridges.
4.4.3 Seismic Forces on Steel Railway Bridges
      4.4.3.1 Equivalent Static Lateral Force
      4.4.3.2 Response Spectrum Analysis of Steel Railway Superstructures
4.4.4 Loads Relating to Overall Stability of the Superstructure..
      4.4.4.1 Derailment Load
      4.4.4.2 Other Loads for Overall Lateral Stability
4.4.5 Pedestrian Loads
4.5 Load and Force Combinations for Design of Steel Railway Superstructures
References.

Chapter 5 Structural Analysis and Design of Steel Railway Bridges

5.1 Introduction
5.2 Structural Analysis of Steel Railway Superstructures
   5.2.1 Live Load Analysis of Steel Railway Superstructures.
      5.2.1.1 Maximum Shear Force and Bending Moment due to Moving Concentrated Loads on Simply Supported Spans
      5.2.1.2 Influence Lines for Maximum Effects of Moving Loads on Superstructures
      5.2.1.3 Equivalent Uniform Loads for Maximum Shear Force and Bending Moment in Simply Supported Spans
      5.2.1.4 Maximum Shear Force and Bending Moment in Simply Supported Spans from Equations and Tables
      5.2.1.5 Modern Structural Analysis
   5.2.2 Lateral Load Analysis of Steel Railway Superstructures
      5.2.2.1 Lateral Bracing Systems
5.3 Structural Design of Steel Railway Superstructures
   5.3.1 Failure Modes of Steel Railway Superstructures.
   5.3.2 Steel Railway Superstructure Design.
      5.3.2.1 Strength Design.
      5.3.2.2 Serviceability Design.
      5.3.2.3 Other Design Criteria for Steel Railway Bridges.
References.

Chapter 6 Design of Axial Force Steel Members.

6.1 Introduction.
6.2 Axial Tension Members
   6.2.1 Strength of Axial Tension Members.
      6.2.1.1 Net Area, An, of Tension Members.
      6.2.1.2 Effective Net Area, Ae, of Tension Members
   6.2.2 Fatigue Strength of Axial Tension Members
   6.2.3 Serviceability of Axial Tension Members
   6.2.4 Design of Axial Tension Members for Steel Railway Bridges
6.3 Axial Compression Members
   6.3.1 Strength of Axial Compression Members.
      6.3.1.1 Elastic Compression Members
      6.3.1.2 Inelastic Compression Members
      6.3.1.3 Yielding of Compression Members
      6.3.1.4 Compression Member Design for Steel Railway Superstructures
   6.3.2 Serviceability of Axial Compression Members
   6.3.3 Axial Compression Members in Steel Railway Superstructures
      6.3.3.1 Buckling Strength of Built-Up Compression Members
References.

Chapter 7 Design of Flexural Steel Members.

7.1 Introduction.
7.2 Strength Design of Noncomposite Flexural Members
   7.2.1 Bending of Laterally Supported Beams and Girders.
   7.2.2 Bending of Laterally Unsupported Beams and Girders.
   7.2.3 Shearing of Beams and Girders
      7.2.3.1 Shearing of Rectangular Beams.
      7.2.3.2 Shearing of I-Shaped Sections
      7.2.3.3 Design for Shearing of Shapes and Plate Girders
   7.2.4 Biaxial Bending of Beams and Girders.
   7.2.5 Preliminary Design of Beams and Girders
   7.2.6 Plate Girder Design
      7.2.6.1 Main Girder Elements
      7.2.6.2 Secondary Girder Elements.
   7.2.7 Box Girder Design
      7.2.7.1 Steel Box Girders..
      7.2.7.2 Steel–Concrete Composite Box Girders.
7.3 Serviceability Design of Noncomposite Flexural Members
7.4 Strength Design of Steel and Concrete Composite Flexural Members
   7.4.1 Flexure in Composite Steel and Concrete Spans.
   7.4.2 Shearing of Composite Beams and Girders
      7.4.2.1 Web Plate Shear
      7.4.2.2 Shear Connection between Steel and Concrete
7.5 Serviceability Design of Composite Flexural Members
References

Chapter 8 Design of Steel Members for Combined Forces

8.1 Introduction
8.2 Biaxial Bending
8.3 Unsymmetrical Bending (Combined Bending and Torsion)
8.4 Combined Axial Forces and Bending of Members.
   8.4.1 Axial Tension and Uniaxial Bending
   8.4.2 Axial Compression and Uniaxial Bending
      8.4.2.1 Differential Equation for Axial Compression and Bending in a Simply Supported Beam
      8.4.2.2 Interaction Equations for Axial Compression and Uniaxial Bending
   8.4.3 Axial Compression and Biaxial Bending.
   8.4.4 AREMA Recommendations for Combined Axial Compression and Biaxial Bending
8.5 Combined Bending and Shear of Plates
References

Chapter 9 Design of Connections for Steel Members.

9.1 Introduction.
9.2 Welded Connections.
   9.2.1 Welding Processes for Steel Railway Bridges.
      9.2.1.1 Shielded Metal Arc Welding
      9.2.1.2 Submerged Arc Welding
      9.2.1.3 Flux Cored Arc Welding
      9.2.1.4 Stud Welding
      9.2.1.5 Welding Electrodes
   9.2.2 Weld Types
      9.2.2.1 Groove Welds
      9.2.2.2 Fillet Welds
   9.2.3 Joint Types
   9.2.4 Welded Joint Design
      9.2.4.1 Allowable Weld Stresses
      9.2.4.2 Fatigue Strength of Welds.
      9.2.4.3 Weld Line Properties
      9.2.4.4 Direct Axial Loads on Welded Connections
      9.2.4.5 Eccentrically Loaded Welded Connections.
      9.2.4.6 Girder Flange to Web “T” Joints
9.3 Bolted Connections
   9.3.1 Bolting Processes for Steel Railway Superstructures.
      9.3.1.1 Snug-Tight Bolt Installation
      9.3.1.2 Pretensioned Bolt Installation
      9.3.1.3 Slip-Critical Bolt Installation
   9.3.2 Bolt Types.
      9.3.2.1 Common Steel Bolts
      9.3.2.2 High-Strength Steel Bolts
   9.3.3 Joint Types
   9.3.4 Bolted Joint Design
      9.3.4.1 Allowable Bolt Stresses.
      9.3.4.2 Axially Loaded Members with Bolts in Shears in Shear and Tension
      9.3.4.4 Axially Loaded Connections with Bolts in Direct Tension
      9.3.4.5 Axial Member Splices.
      9.3.4.6 Beam and Girder Splices
References

Chapter 10 Construction of Steel Railway Bridges: Superstructure Fabrication

10.1 Introduction.
10.2 Fabrication Planning
     10.2.1 Project Cost Estimating.
     10.2.2 Shop Drawings for Steel Fabrication
     10.2.3 Fabrication Shop Production Scheduling and Detailed
     10.2.4 Material Procurement for Fabrication
10.3 Steel Fabrication Processes
     10.3.1 Material Preparation
         10.3.1.1 Layout and Marking of Plates and Shapes.
         10.3.1.2 Cutting of Plates and Shapes.
         10.3.1.3 Straightening, Bending, Curving, and Cambering of Plates and Shapes
         10.3.1.4 Surface Preparation..
         10.3.1.5 Heat Treatment.
    10.3.2 Punching and Drilling of Plates and Shapes.
         10.3.2.1 Hole Quality
         10.3.2.2 Punching and Drilling Accuracy for Shop and Field Fasteners
    10.3.3 Shop Assembly for Fit-Up of Steel Plates and Shapes.
         10.3.3.1 Fabrication of Cambered Superstructure Assemblies
         10.3.3.2 Shop Assembly of Longitudinal Beams, Girders, and Trusses
         10.3.3.3 Progressive Shop Assembly of Longitudinal Beams,Girders, and Trusses
         10.3.3.4 Shop Assembly of Bolted Splices and Connections.
         10.3.3.5 Fit-Up for Shop Welded Splices and Connections
         10.3.3.6 Fabrication and Erection Tolerances
10.4. Bolting of Plates and Shapes..
10.5 Welding of Plates and Shapes.
    10.5.1 Shop Welding Processes
    10.5.2 Shop Welding Procedures.
    10.5.3 Effects of Welding on Plates and Shapes
         10.5.3.1 Welding Flaws
         10.5.3.2 Welding-Induced Cracking
         10.5.3.3 Welding-Induced Distortion
         10.5.3.4 Welding-Induced Residual Stresses
         10.5.3.5 Welding-Induced Lamellar Tearing
10.6 Coating of Steel Plates and Shapes for Railway Superstructures.
10.7 QC and QA of Fabrication.
    10.7.1 QC Inspection of Fabrication.
    10.7.2 QA Inspection of Fabrication.
        10.7.2.1 Shop or Detail Drawing Review
        10.7.2.2 Inspection of Raw Materials
        10.7.2.3 Inspection of Fabricated Members
        10.7.2.4 Assembly Inspection
       10.7.2.5 Bolting Inspection
       10.7.2.6 Welding Inspection
       10.7.2.7 Coatings Inspection
       10.7.2.8 Final Inspection for Shipment
    10.7.3 NDT for QC and QA Inspection of Welded Fabrication
       10.7.3.1 Dye-Penetrant Testing
       10.7.3.2 Magnetic Particle Testing (Figure 10.25)
       10.7.3.3 Ultrasonic Testing (Figure 10.26)
       10.7.3.4 Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing
       10.7.3.5 Radiographic Testing (Figure 10.27)
Bibliography

Chapter 11 Construction of Steel Railway Bridges: Superstructure Erection.

11.1 Introduction.
11.2 Erection Planning
     11.2.1 Erection Methods and Procedures Planning
     11.2.2 Erection Methods and Equipment Planning.
         11.2.2.1 Erection with Cranes and Derricks
         11.2.2.2 Erection on Falsework and Lateral Skidding of Superstructures.
         11.2.2.3 Erection by Flotation with Barges
         11.2.2.4 Erection with Stationary and Movable Frames.
         11.2.2.5 Other Erection Methods.
11.3 Erection Engineering
    11.3.1 Erection Engineering for Member Strength and Stability.
    11.3.2 Erection Engineering for Cranes and Derricks.
         11.3.2.1 Stationary Derricks.
         11.3.2.2 Mobile Cranes
   11.3.3 Erection Engineering for Falsework
   11.3.4 Erection Engineering for Cranes, Derricks, and Falsework on Barges
   11.3.5 Erection Engineering for Stationary and Movable Frames.
   11.3.6 Engineering for Other Erection Methods
        11.3.6.1 Erection Engineering for Launching
        11.3.6.2 Erection Engineering for Cantilever Construction
        11.3.6.3 Engineering for Tower and Cable, and Catenary High-Line Erection
        11.3.6.4 Engineering for SPMT Erection
11.4 Erection Execution
   11.4.1 Erection by Mobile Cranes.
   11.4.2 Falsework Construction.
   11.4.3 Erection Fit-Up.
   11.4.4 Erection of Field Splices and Connections.
       11.4.4.1 Welded Field Splices and Connections
       11.4.4.2 Bolted Field Splices and Connections
11.4.5 Field Erection Completion.

Bibliography

Appendix A: Design of a Ballasted through Plate Girder (BTPG) Superstructure
Appendix B: Design of a Ballasted Deck Plate Girder (BDPG) Superstructure
Appendix C: Units of Measurement.
Index
 

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